Pages

Thursday, August 20, 2009

#Active August Morning Routine

I tweeted my typical morning fitness routine earlier this month as part of #ActiveAugust.
Thought it would be a good idea to further define it in a blog post in case it might inspire someone to start their own morning fitness routine.
I'm big on exercise that doesn't require a gym membership and a minimum amount of equipment.

Most mornings: 20 minutes Nordic Track, 20 minutes Tai Chi and a bit of yoga.

NordicTrack cross-country ski machine for 20 - 30 minutes.

Tai Chi - 3 rounds.
I learned the Yang short form (37 moves) in college from Robert Smith.
I'm currently working on the Chen 38 form from Ren Guang Yi's book Taijiquan Chen Taiji 38 Form and Applications and watching relevant YouTube videos. I've figured out the first third of it at this point.

Yoga postures between Tai Chi rounds were learned from DVDs Beginning Yoga by Patricia Walden and Power Yoga, Total Fitness by Rodney Yee.
The postures I typically do include Triangle Pose, Warrior poses, and Sun Salutations.
Also, I use a sequence that was defined in the JUST CHILL column in the January 2007 Outside magazine entitled cheat on your yoga teacher.

Total workout time typically 30 - 45 minutes depending on the mix of the above.

I use the following videos for reference from YouTube.com:
  1. Chen Manching Yang Tai Chi short form (full set) http://bit.ly/2Hdiw
  2. Chen Style Taijiquan 38 Form http://bit.ly/PgDXr
  3. Dirty Jobs : Mike's Mail : Mike's Prison Workout http://bit.ly/zRGXg
Also, I work on the third floor of my building and park on third floor of the parking garage.
I use the steps 99% of the time.

In closing, Robert Smith introduces Tai Chi in his book this way, "Man cannot live fully without exercise. The I Ching (Book of Changes) says: "Nature is always in motion. Man also should strengthen himself without interruption."

Time to get moving.

Wednesday, August 5, 2009

Convincing DBAs to Learn PowerShell

Currently, I am the sole DBA at my employer to dive deep into Microsoft Windows PowerShell.

It has become my most important tool for discovering the state of our database server inventory as we work towards our standardization goals.

It is also the main tool I use to answer questions about the inventory that require querying multiple servers.

As I have learned how to use PowerShell, I have shared scripts and one-liners with my co-workers for the past year or more in an effort to convince them it is worthwhile to learn.
I've written a couple of articles at Simple Talk describing some of my scripting experience.
I've shared links to blog posts, articles, and tips on how to use PowerShell.
It got me thinking about what is the best way to get someone started with PowerShell.

In my efforts to learn PowerShell, I was always looking for examples.

In my opinion, this is the best way to start after some initial readings on the PowerShell basics.

So, my latest recommendations to my fellow DBAs to learn Windows Powershell are:

  1. PowerGUI
  2. Keith Hill's Effective Windows PowerShell PDF
  3. Dr. Tobias Weltner's Mastering PowerShell eBook

The best part about the above recommendations are they are all FREE.

My example-driven book recommendation would have to be Lee Holmes' Windows PowerShell Cookbook.

Finally, there are many PowerShell examples available on the web to help you become proficient.

Use your favorite search engine to find them.