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Convincing DBAs to Learn PowerShell

Currently, I am the sole DBA at my employer to dive deep into Microsoft Windows PowerShell.

It has become my most important tool for discovering the state of our database server inventory as we work towards our standardization goals.

It is also the main tool I use to answer questions about the inventory that require querying multiple servers.

As I have learned how to use PowerShell, I have shared scripts and one-liners with my co-workers for the past year or more in an effort to convince them it is worthwhile to learn.
I've written a couple of articles at Simple Talk describing some of my scripting experience.
I've shared links to blog posts, articles, and tips on how to use PowerShell.
It got me thinking about what is the best way to get someone started with PowerShell.

In my efforts to learn PowerShell, I was always looking for examples.

In my opinion, this is the best way to start after some initial readings on the PowerShell basics.

So, my latest recommendations to my fellow DBAs to learn Windows Powershell are:

  1. PowerGUI
  2. Keith Hill's Effective Windows PowerShell PDF
  3. Dr. Tobias Weltner's Mastering PowerShell eBook

The best part about the above recommendations are they are all FREE.

My example-driven book recommendation would have to be Lee Holmes' Windows PowerShell Cookbook.

Finally, there are many PowerShell examples available on the web to help you become proficient.

Use your favorite search engine to find them.

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