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SQL Saturday #40 in South Florida recap.

Speaker dinner was great at Longhorn Steakhouse.  Thanks to Confio Software and SQLSkills.com for picking up the dinner and bar tab. Great to meet more SQL Tweeps in person and catch up with previous acquaintances.

Evidently, the organizers did a fantastic job marketing this event because there were a large number of attendees.  The numbers I heard were in the 400 - 500 range. Rooms were full for the talks I saw and the Commons was busy.

Check-in was very smooth.  Speaker room was great.  Plenty of water, refreshments, and food for the attendees.  Technical support from DeVry University staff was very helpful.

The PowerShell room was packed for my first session at 8:30 am on "Why DBAs Should Learn PowerShell".  I think I may retitle this "Why ANYONE Can Learn PowerShell". 

My second session on how to automate database login administration and compliance reporting was also well attended.

Had a great time eating a super lunch from Jason's Deli in the speaker room.  Showed @BrentO and Tim Ford(@sqlagentman) my slides from my first deck. I was inspired by Brent's post on how to find great photos for your slide decks.  Got to see Brent speak in person for the first time.  Smooth as silk he was. Even when the power blinked out at the perfect moment in his talk on DR.  

I still picked up a few tips on DR and Virtualization despite him saying it was a 100 level talk.  He provided guidance on size thresholds for virtualization candidates and he confirmed my thinking on the best HA/DR options for SQL Server.

What makes a SQL Saturday great?  Everyone who pitches in from the community.  

Great job by the organizers, sponsors, and speakers for this event! Awesomesauce all over this event.

Comments

  1. Hey Now RonDBA,

    Nice post read every word! Nice to meet you, it sure was a stellar event, hope to see your session @ a future event.

    Thx 4 the info,
    Catto

    ReplyDelete

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